facebook icon Twitter icon Google+ icon Instagram icon Linkedin icon pinterest icon tumblr icon

Persian Hostel Co.

Best offers for You

Type of accommodation

Cozy Privatized Dorm (15$)

Cozy dorm image

Privatized dorm bed with cabin design، separate lighting and outlet for each bed, lockers next to the bed, bathroom, free Wi-Fi, good complete breakfast.

See photos and book

Private Double Room (45$)

Private room image

Private rooms with a couch, desk, shared bathroom just by the door in the dorm, free Wi-Fi, as well as a good complete breakfast.

See photos and book

Private Twin Room (45$)

Private room image

Private rooms with a couch, desk, shared bathroom just by the door in the dorm, free Wi-Fi, as well as a good complete breakfast.

See photos and book

3-bed private room (60$)

Hotel apartment image-3

3-bed private room with private bathroom and kitchen

See photos and book

4-bed private room (70$)

Hotel apartment image-4

4-bed private room with private bathroom and kitchen

See photos and book

5-bedroom apartment (80$)

Hotel apartment image-5

5-bedroom apartment with private bathroom and kitchen

See photos and book
Preface to Tehran

Preface to Tehran


Preface to Tehran

Tehran which, today, tops the list of the largest capital cities in the world was once, in its infancy, one in many of hte small and trivial villages around the city of Rey and was of such nominal importance that the geographers of the day would not even mention its name amongst geographical locations. The earliest record of the word Tehran as a geographical location can be traced back in the name of two authors one: Abu Abd-ollah Mohammad ibn Hemad Tehrani Razi in 874 A.D. and the other Mohammad ibn Ahmad ibn Saeed Doulabi Tehrani (838-922 A.D). One might doubt whether the word Tehran as it appears in these two names is the same Tehran as we know it today. Fortunately, the answer to this question is found in Beyhaghi's accounts, relating that Mahmud Ghaznavid erected his army camp in a location near Rey known as Doulab. This in itself is enough proof that Doulab was a place in the proximity of Rey and the title Tehrani Razi as found in the name of the first author, reveals that Tehran was related to Rey (Razi) as well. Further evidence is found in Farsnameh by Ibn Balkhi in 1116 A.D. where much is said in praise of the pomegranates of Tehran compared to those of other regions in Iran. Evidence elicited from other historical accounts state the perimeter of Tehran of those days to span an area from the north reaching Qasran and the Alborz mountain range, and from the south bordering the city of Rey. Raavandi in his accounts of the year 1063 A.D. relates that Togrol died in Tajrish (a district in the north of Tehran today). Togrol's resting place is today located in the south of Tehran adjacent to Ebn e Babveyh cemetery.

All these depict Tehran as it was before the Mongol invasion. The Mongol invasion affected all cities and villages to different degrees. During the Mongol invasion, Tehran is described by Zakariya Qazvini in 1275 A.D. as a large and densely populated village with orchards and outstanding pomegranate gardens. A large village where people lived in houses built underground to stay safe from the invaders. So, each time the village was attacked, people would take shelter in the houses underground and stay under until the enemy would leave the village, believing that it is already abandoned. He also describes Tehran's residents as rebellious and in conflict with the ruling authorities and and people who would shirk from paying their dues and taxes to the and had more animosity among themselves than friendship. The earliest accounts of Tehran after the Mongol period can be found in Zafarnameh (Book of Victory) by Sharaf-ed Din All Yazdi Mostc. 1454 B.0 during the Timurid period. Amir Timur (1336-1405 A., attacked the Ilkanids, Baduspanids and Jalayirids for three times, during these invasions built his military base in Rey and stayed in Tehran for twenty days. On his way from Qarabagh to Samarkand, he appointed Amir Solaiman Shah to the position of ruler of Tehran and Firouzkuh. It was during this journey that we find the first European who has recorded the events of those days in his diaries.

Preface to Tehran

Cheragh Gaz Avenue 25. In this picture the clash of elemental traces of modernity with traditional ways in one of the main avenues of Tehran is shown. Pedestrians and seated riders face each other at a bottleneck in traffic caused by horse-pulled wagons. Police and stray dogs wander through the crowd of people who are trying to make their way in between two stalled wagons —one for women, the other for men. Most of the men wear traditional clothes, while a few wear a form of European-inspired overcoat. The commotion is taking place in front of the open doors of the Gas Lamp Factory, established to provide light for the city dwellers. Wagons continue to roam the few main streets until the early 1930s. 1890, Sevruguin and Pictures of Iran, compiled by Fredrick Bohler, 1990.

Ruy Gonzalez Clavijo (?- April 2, 1412) was the ambassador of Henry Ill of Castile, Spain to the court of Timur, founder and ruler of the Timurid Empire. A diary of the Journey, perhaps based on detailed notes kept while traveling, was later published in Spanish in 1582 (Embajada a Tamorlan) and in English in 1859 (Narrative of the Embassy of Ruy Gonzalez de Clavijo to the Court of Timur at Samarcand A.D. 1403-6). Clavijo arrived in Tehran on Sunday, June 6th, 1404 and was welcomed by Baba Sheikh in Timur's Court. He finds Tehran a city without forts and towers, a city with a hot climate yet full of amenities. From Clavijo's accounts, one can conclude that at that time, Rey was declining due to Mongol attacks and Tehran was thriving, going through a transition phase from a rural place to an urban center. It was in 1537 during the Safavid period when Shah Tah-masb I crossed Tehran to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of Imamzade Hamzeh near Shah Abd-ol Azim shrine that he became interested in this city. He paid one or more visits to this place and in 1556 ordered that a wall be erected around it, embracing the 6000-pace perimeter of the city. The wall had 114 towers, each of which bore a verse from the Holy Koran as blessing. The towers were 52 paces apart from each other. There were 40 towers on the southern wall, 21 towers on the eastern wall, 31 towers on the northern wall and 22 towers on the western wall. A moat was dug around the wall for more security. At that time, there were four Holy Shrines in Tehran: Emamzadeh Yahya, Emamzadeh Isma'iI, Emamzadeh Seyed Nasr-ed Din and Emamzadeh Zeyd, all within the surrounding wall. There were also four gates (Dar-vazeh) to Tehran: Darvazeh Hazrate Abd-oI Azim in the south, Darvazeh Shemiran in the north, Darvazeh Qazvin in the west and Darvazeh Doulab in the east. This is how Tehran became a city.

In the Safavid period, Abd-ol Mo'men Uzbak conquers the city of Mashad and starts killing the people there and looting their property. Upon hearing this news, Shah Abbas I leaves Qazvin for Mashad to fight him only to fall ill in Tehran. He spent two months of illness in Tehran, during which Abd-ol Mo'men kept looting the city of Mashad. After the period of two months, Shah Abbas leaves his sick bed and learns that Abd-ol Mo'men has left the city of Mashad after killing scores of people and stripping them of their possessions. This incident left Shah Abbas with bad memories of Tehran and caused him to detest the city and swear not to return to this city forever. It was during this time that the Italian traveler Pietro Della Valle pays a visit to Tehran and in his diaries of 1617 writes that Tehran is a large city with orchards rich in fruits, larger than Qazvin, yet with a smaller population.

Since Shah Abbas’s mother was from Mazandaran province in the north of Iran, he ordered that a road be constructed to join Tehran to Mazandaran. Also, since there was an abundance of maple trees in Tehran, Shah Abbas ordered for a wide avenue to be constructed flanked by maple trees like the one in Chahar Bagh Isfahan. This avenue later housed a large palace which was built upon the decree of Shah Ismaili. The palace served as a citadel and was called the Diwan Khaneh and is the place where Shah Soltan Hosain received the ambassador of the Ottoman Soltan Ahmad III after thirteen days of his arrival in Tehran. During the Afgan's up-rise which toppled the Safavid dynasty, a gate, Ashraf Gate, was added to the northern wing of the citadel so that people could escape from the citadel. When Nader Shah defeated the Afgans in Mehman Doost, the Afgans killed a number of the dignitaries in Tehran in retaliation and fleed. An accidental fire to the gun-powder house in the citadel killed the remaining 80 Afgans in Tehran. Nader Shah was also fighting the Topal Ottoman Pasha and after a small defeat retreated to Tehran to refresh the troops and went back to the battle fields. He defeated the Ottoman army and killed Topal Pasha and returned to Tehran as the new King. He appointed his son. Reza Qoli Mirza as the ruler of Tehran, but becames suspicious of him after an assassination attempt which he escaped in Mazandaran forests. His suspicion caused him to have his son blinded in 1741.

When Nader Shah died in 1758, Tehran fell under the rule of Karim Khan Zand who had formerly defeated Mohammad Hasan Khan Qajar. He settled in Tehran and made new additions to the city such as merging the two quarters of Oudlajan and Chaleh Meydan, constructing the moat around the palace in 1759. He left Tehran for Shiraz in 1762 and took Aqa Mohammad Khan Qajar the son of Mohammad Hasan Khan Qajar with him. Part of the constructions of his period is still preserved in the Golestan Palace. He appointed Qafour Khan Zand as the ruler of Tehran.

When Karim Khan died, Aqa Mohammad Khan Qajar rushed to the Qajar tribes in the north and commanded them, under Ali Qoli Khan, to conquer Tehran. His attempts all tell furtile and Tehran remained under the rein of the Zand Dynasty. When Qafour Khan Zand died, the reign was passed over to Taher Khan Zand. The Zand dynasty eventually lost its power due to internal conflicts and in 1784 it was Majnoun Khan Pazooki who besieged the city and heralded his victory to Aqa Mohammad Khan Qajar.

Aqa Moahamad Khan Qajar arrived in Tehran in 1 New Thar Eve and declared himself also as the new king and had coins minted in his name. He also declared Tehran as the capital city in 1797, mended the surrounding walls and towers, deepened the moat and demolished the Karim Khan citadel in Shiraz to use its materials to make additions to the citadel in Tehran. On the day Tehran was declared the capital, it had a population of 15,000 people, a population which was on the rise during Fath-Ah Shah's period as well. Fath-Ali Shah has numerous children and had many residential and governmental buildings constructed. During his reign, the population of Tehran reached 80,000 people and Tehran expanded so that the distance from its northern extremity to the southern one was 2200 meters and the distance between its east and west was about 4000 meters.

Persian Hostel in Tehran Group comes forth with detailed knowledge of Iran so as to enlighten those who aim to visit Iran of each and every minor and major sights in Iran. Besides, our team not only provides the best cheap hotel in Tehran, but also we are run Persian Tour Service Co. in order to tell and offer you tours which help you to know the best places to visit Iran and in Tehran

Much is said about Tehran in that period; Zeyn-ol Abedin Shirvani in 1821 cited:

Tehran has a milder weather compared to that of other regions, it has good grapes, figs and melons. Its northern territories comprise about 15,000 houses. It gets hot in the summer and has many orchards and gardens in its outskirts." James Morier, the author of 'Haji Baba Isfahanit who was a member of the British Embassy at those days cites:

"Tehran has a rampart of 4 to 5 miles with six gates. The city as large as Shiraz but has a smaller population. It has an unfavorable weather in the summer and disagreeable drinking water which makes most of the Embassy staff sick." PA. Jaubert, Napoleon's ambassador to Tehran in 1806 found Tehran a city with an average rampart and very ordinary towers, with buildings that do not compare with those of Isfahan, and have very unattractive facades. He also cites that Tehran did not undergo much improvement during his stay except for the population that was growing ever more and the drinking water was totally disagreeable. Rich people would have their supply of drinking water brought to them from out of the city. General Gardanne, who was in Tehran until 1818 said that Tehran had no reliable plan for times of war; only a moat around the city parameter and a mud tower near each gate at a distance of 200 to 300 paces would not keep it safe from adversaries. The British explorer, Robert Ker Porter, who sojourned in Tehran from 1818 to 1821 finds Tehran a city with a disagreeable weather in the summer though it has many gardens in it. The city is surrounded by a moat and there are round brick towersat a distance of 200 yards from each gate. The gates are simple in design and are decorated with only a few tiles. People exiting the gates are closely watched. Fath-Ali Shah resides in the citadel which is protected and fortified. The city streets are narrow and in winter they become muddy and rutted. During the reign of Mohammad Shah who succeeded Fath-Ali Shah, the King's Premier Mirza Aqasi paid serious attention to the issue of Tehran's drinking water and it was he who had canals constructed to carry fresh drinking water from Karaj to Tehran's Oudlajan and other quarters. Migration to Tehran soars during this time since many cities in the north of Iran were attacked and conquered by the Russian forces. Eugene Flandin visited Tehran in 1841 and wrote in his diaries that Tehran is a city with a parameter of four to five kilometers, with six gates. Each gate has a tower built near it. The towers are hundred meters apart and situated in front of each gate. He estimates Tehran's population to the 100,000 and found six or seven mosques, three or four schools, a hundred public baths and a hundred caravansarys in it. He found Tehran's Bazaar dirty and ill-shaped and states that people's houses were all built of mud bricks, so the rain would wash the walls down and destroy them. After each rain, people had to mend their homes. He also cites that Tehran had bad water running in the street gutters.

This was the situation of Tehran as it was passed over to Naser-ed Din Shah. The lack of housing had Mirza Taqi Khan Amir Kabir, Naser-ed Din Shah's Grand Premier, have two hundred houses built outside the city limits In the summer of 1857 the King also assigned Mohammad Tqi Khan Me/mar to divide the three gardens of Khosrow Khan, Qourkhaneh and Amanollah Khan and sell them to prospective buyers. These expansions did not yet suffice the ever growing population and the King ordered for the addition of 1800 meters of land to the northern extremities of the city and a thousand meters to the other three sides. According to Iran Newspaper in 1876, the new expansion was inaugurated by Naser-ed Din Shah himself who opened the ceremony with a silver pick-ax he lays ceremonially. Thus, the towers left from Shah Tahmasb's period along with part of the protecting wall were demolished, expanding Tehran’s borders to Shah Reza street in the north, Si Metri street in the west, Shush in the south and Shahnaz street to the east. A new moat was also dug around the new city borders. The new moat was functional until 1930 when during the reign of Reza Shah Pahlavi the city walls fctere torn down and the moat was also filled. Tehran kept expanding in all dimensions and today it spans an area, reaching the Alborz mountain range from the north, Hashtgerd from the west, AID e All from the east and Kahrizak from the south. No one knows for certain where and when this expansion will come to an end.

There are some hostels in Tehran which have had successful result such as See you in Iran hostel, Seven Hostel in Tehran, Tehran Hostel in Tehran, Hi Hostel in Tehran. If you want to book budget accommodation in Tehran, these are the best hostels in Tehran.

Preface to Tehran

Preface to Tehran

Preface to Tehran

Preface to Tehran
Clock pic

Copyright © Persian Hostel - Hostel in Tehran , All Rights Reserved © 2016-2020